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Self Portrait (Inn of the Dawn Horse)

Artwork of the Week

Self Portrait (Inn of the Dawn Horse)

"Self-Portrait (The Inn of the Dawn Horse)” is one of Leonora Carrington's most important paintings, also accepted as the artist's first Surrealist artwork. The painting features hyena and horse figures that dominate most of the artist's future works. Carrington depicts herself with mane-like hair and white jodhpurs in a dream-like setting. The horse figure in the background symbolizes both freedom and Epona, a goddess in Celtic mythology who appears to people as a white horse. The rocking horse floating above her head, on the other hand, refers to the character Penelope, who falls in love with her rocking horse in a theater play that the artist loves. Carrington places the hyena in a domestic setting and uses it as a mirror to herself as she likens the hyena to her own temperament. The oil painting, painted by Carrington in 1937, can be seen at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

The Promise of Grass

News of the Week

The Promise of Grass

The 5th Mardin Biennial, curated by Adwait Singh with the concept of “The Promise of Grass”, opened to visitors on Friday, May 20. Exploring the possibility of a social ecology, the biennial refers to the concept of gift economies and pursues radical experiences to this end. The Mardin Biennial, which will last until June 20, brings together the works of artists from a wide geography, from Denmark to Kazakhstan, from Bulgaria to South Africa, from Haiti to Switzerland and the USA. The works of Sibel Horada, Burcu Yağcıoğlu, Lara Ögel, Merve Ünsal, Ömer Pekin, Server Demirtaş, Gülsün Karamustafa, İpek Hamzaoğlu, Fatoş İrwen and Selma Gürbüz from Turkey are exhibited this year in the biennial, where artists from 21 countries participate. Expressed by the curator Adwait Singht as the subject of reorganization, renewal and productive chaos, which is life itself, the biennial also refers to the characteristics of “Grass” that heals the wounds of the soil and renews it.

Leonora Carrington

Artist of the Week

Leonora Carrington

Born in 1917 in England, Leonora Carrington is known for her novels as well as her artworks. The stories from Celtic mythology, which her Irish mother told her as a child, are seen as a source of inspiration for the symbolism in the artist's works. Emerging as an important figure during the Surrealist movement of the 1930s, Carrington makes use of themes such as witchcraft, alchemy, the occult, and metamorphosis in her works. The artist's mastery of Surrealism is also evident in her novels The House of Horror, The Oval Lady and Debutante. After her works were exhibited in a Surrealist exhibition held at the Pierre Matisse Gallery in 1947 as the only professional female painter, Carrington quickly made a name for herself as one of the leading female painters of the Surrealist movement. Her "Jongleur" painting broke the record as the most expensive work sold by a living Surrealist painter in 2005. The works of the artist were exhibited in institutions such as MoMA and Guggenheim during her lifetime. Many of the works of the artist, who passed away in 2011, are at the Leonora Carrington Museum in Mexico, where she spent most of her life.